Can I Play For NSLL?
Posted Feb 7, 2018

Before Registration be sure you can play for NSLL.  Your player needs to live or attend school with in the North Snohomish League Bondaries.  If you played with us last season and have moved you can still play for NSLL.

Questions?  Check out Find My League http://www.littleleague.org/leaguefinder.htm tool or contact us board@northsnohomishbaseball.com

 
NSLL Annual Board Meeting

NSLL Annual Board Meeting

October 22nd 2018 6pm @ Alfy's Pizza in Snohomish | Fireplace Room

 
Little League International Practice Programs

Little League International has created practice programs for Tee Ball and for Coach Pitch baseball (the Rookie level at NSLL, which uses a machine rather than a coach).

The Little League Tee Ball Program is a 10-week plan that features structured learning highlighted by one practice and one game per week. Over the course of the season, coaches will engage in a series of lessons utilizing up to 40 activities that include skills, drills, and plenty of physical activity.

The Little League Coach Pitch Program is a 12-week plan focusing n the fundamentals of baseball, and is designed to build a solid foundation for becoming a successful ballplayer.

A program for Softball Coach Pitch is coming soon.

These programs are great resources for first-time and verteran coaches. Each program includes:

  • Detailed practice plans for each week of the program
  • Quick practice plans for each week of the program
  • Activity Guides and/or detailed diagrams explaining each drill and activity
  • Positive Coaching Alliance (PCA) Tips for each week of the program
  • For Tee Ball, SKLZ Fun-damentals videos focusing on teaching basic Tee Ball skills
 
How to Keep Score in Baseball

Here are a couple of videos teaching the new scorekeeper how to "keep book" in baseball. There are many ways to keep score, but these videos teach the basics and will allow anyone to keep track of their next baseball game. Every team from Rookie and above, both baseball and softball, should maintain a team scorebook and track pitches on a Little League Pitching Log.

 
How to Repair Pitching Mounds (and Batter's Boxes)

The natural pitching mounds develop holes in front of the pitching rubber and at the landing spot. Batter's boxes develop holes in certain areas as well. These holes are easy to repair, and repairs should be done after every use (especially for the pitcher's mounds). The repairs are very easy to do and take little time. Coaches should also be prepared to do these repairs before their games, in case the prior team did not do them (or left the field after dark). Following is a ste-by-step guide on how to repair pitching mounds (the same process is used for batter's boxes).

STEP 1 -- TOOLS AND MATERIAL

You will first need to get the tools and material out to the pitcher's mound. You will need:

  • A broom
  • A tamp (plastic over the end can help prevent clay from sticking to the tamp)
  • A shovel, edger, rake, or other tool to cut the clay
  • Loose mound clay

STEP 2 -- CLEAN AREA TO BE REPAIRED

The area to be repaired must be free of as much loose material as possible. We want the new mound clay to bind with the clay in the mound, and the loose material will interfere with that process.

STEP 3 -- CUT THE AREA TO BE REPAIRED

Once the hole is clean, cuts need to be made so the new clay will fully bind with the existing clay. This photo illustrates what the hole should look like when you have completed this step (the tools and material are also shown).

STEP 4 -- WET THE AREA TO BE REPAIRED

Now add water to the area where the new clay will be added. The intent is to get the area damp, but there should not be any standing water. As with the earlier steps, the water will help the new clay bind with the existing clay.

STEP 5 -- ADD LOOSE CLAY

Add loose clay to the hole. If the hole is large, add clay in stages, tamping the clay firm between stages. For a hole like the one pictured above, just fill the hole with clay to a level a little higer than the rubber.

STEP 6 -- TAMP SOLID

Now firmly tamp the new clay. The goal is to transform the loose clay into a solid mass that has bound with the existing clay. The end result should be a very solid surface roughly even with (or slightly below) the height of the rubber. The picture below illustrates a completed repair.

STEP 7 -- REPLACE LOOSE MATERIAL

The final step is to replace the loose material. This can be done with the broom. The broom can also be used to generally clean up the rest of the mound. In doing so, be sure to pull the loose material away from the grass and toward the top of the mound. Allowing loose material into the grass causes the lip around the mound to build up.

AND THAT'S ALL THERE IS TO IT!!

 
Videos on Mound Repair

There are several videos online depicting how to repair a pitching mound. Here is one:

And here is the New York Yankees ground crew employing the same method for an in-game mound repair: